Patterns in Art is coming out soon!

The long wait is (almost) over, Patterns in Art is coming out soon! In November, Abbeville Press will publish our book in the US. We have spent over a year observing paintings from four centuries of art history, searching for apparently secondary details - such as tiles, fabrics, tablecloths, and other ornaments. We have extracted … Continue reading Patterns in Art is coming out soon!

Is it necessary for a science communicator to be a philosophical realist?

This essay, written for my Masters in Science Communication at Imperial College, explores to which extent certain philosophical stances affect the work of a science communicator. https://www.academia.edu/30008960/Is_it_necessary_for_a_science_communicator_to_be_a_philosophical_realist

An essay on the short documentary Ten Meter Tower

In this essay, written for the Documentary Theory module of my Masters in Science Communication, I review the short documentary Ten Meter Tower, asking whether it succeeds in its goal of displaying some universal trait of human behaviour. https://www.academia.edu/31665349/An_essay_on_the_short_documentary_Ten_Meter_Tower

Italian “Fertility Day” brings us back to the fifties and dramatically fails in its purpose: a semiotic analysis

On the 22nd September 2016, Beatrice Lorenzin, Italy's Health Minister, launched the first Italian “Fertility Day” campaign, to fight the fertility decrease in the country. However, the sexist, offensive and old-fashioned ideologies of the campaign resulted in its failure. In this essay written for my Masters in Science Communication at Imperial College London, I examined … Continue reading Italian “Fertility Day” brings us back to the fifties and dramatically fails in its purpose: a semiotic analysis

Clouded judgment

Originally published on I, Science Magazine. Photo credits: Kalyani Lodhia On the morning of 6 December, 1952, Mrs Huntington opened her bedroom window, lazily meandered through to the kitchen, and started to prepare her usual bowl of porridge. It was a particularly cold December and she could feel that the damp, freezing air was making … Continue reading Clouded judgment

Plausibility

Originally published on I, Science Magazine (Winter issue 2016) I had always thought about misery as something you find under the sea. A small, unattainable pebble. It would take years of swimming in the deepest water to find it. In order to unearth such a misery, you need to look for it – I used … Continue reading Plausibility